8 days

Program Overview

In this Boston, New York City and Washington DC program, students start their journey through U.S. history in Boston, where the first shots were fired in the war for independence at Lexington and Concord. Explore the oldest park in the U.S., walk the historical sites of the Freedom Trail and go on a student-led tour of Harvard University. From there, we travel to the multicultural metropolis of New York City, introducing students to the nation’s origins through the stories of immigrants on Liberty Island and Ellis Island. Stop over in Philadelphia for sightseeing with the tour director, visiting Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell Center. With newfound independence, the U.S. government officially set Washington DC as its capital. Experience the landmarks that hold our history and see the original records of our rights and freedoms: The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

Map

Destination Highlights

This grand tour of U.S. history begins in Boston. Students tour the oldest school of higher education in the U.S., Harvard, which also has the largest academic library in the world. At Boston Common, students learn more about the oldest public park in the U.S., dating back to 1634. As a National Historical Landmark itself, Quincy Market is the perfect place for students to have dinner in Boston. With an 18th-century costumed guide, students tour the historic sites on the Freedom Trail Walk. One of these sites is the Old South Meeting House, which became iconic on the signal of Samual Adams sending the Sons of Liberty to dump chests of tea into the harbor. See where the war for independence officially began in the battles of Lexington and Concord.

Explore the first capital of the U.S. under the Constitution, New York City. Stand at the “Crossroads of the World”, Times Square, while on a walking tour of Midtown. See the city at night, lit up in all its glory, from the top of the Empire State Building. Set foot beneath the Statue of Liberty, a symbol of freedom promised by our country. Ellis Island is the entry point for many of the original immigrants to the U.S., whose descendents make up nearly half of our current population. Visit the 9/11 Memorial, built on the site where the twin towers fell. Walk around Lower Manhattan to see where New York City began.

Continuing on the path of the beginnings of U.S. history, this trip takes students to Philadelphia for a day to sightsee with a tour director at the Independence National Historical Park. On the tour of the Independence Hall, known as “the birthplace of America,” students see where the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution were signed. Nearby, take a look at the cracked Liberty Bell, symbolizing liberty for all people. On this day trip, stop by Ben Franklin’s Grave and leave a penny for luck, stroll through Elfreth’s Alley and visit Arch Street Meeting House.

Since gaining independence, the U.S. has grown into a world power. Washington DC did not exist until is was created specifically to serve as the capital of the U.S. government in 1800. Explore the U.S. Capitol Building to see the artistic representations of history in the Crypt, Rotunda and the National Statuary Hall. Find the “Flame of Knowledge” at the Library of Congress and the columned architecture of the U.S. Supreme Court on Capitol Hill. At the National Archives, see the documents that record our basic rights and freedoms up close: The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and Bill of Rights. Go on a scavenger hunt through the world-class Smithsonian Museums, the funds for which were donated by a man who never set foot in the U.S.

Explore the symbols of American freedoms in Washington DC. One shining example is the Lincoln Memorial, inscribed with Lincoln’s famous speeches and where Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his famous speech. Visit the memorials to the leaders of U.S. freedoms at the Tidal Basin. The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial expresses the value of national parks belonging to everyone. He is also known for his State of the Union Address that outlined four essential human freedoms. More than a metaphorical mountain, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is “a stone of hope,” symbolizing all that Martin Luther King stood for and proclaimed in his “I Have A Dream” speech in 1963. Depending on the time of year, the Jefferson Memorial may be wreathed in cherry blossoms. Thomas Jefferson was the primary author of the Declaration of Independence.

Daily Itinerary

Learning Outcomes

Learn the historical importance of U.S. landmarks in Boston, Washington DC and New York City. Home to the beginnings of the American Revolution, Boston connects students to the history around the war for independence. In Washington DC, gain a deeper understanding of how the U.S. grew as a nation and get to know the leaders of U.S. freedoms. Explore the famous sights of New York City and come away with stronger cultural awareness of how immigrants came to the U.S. with the hope of peace and freedom.

Services Included

Transportation

Private transportation provided throughout the program.

Activities

All scheduled activities and experiences are included in the cost.

Tours and Site Visits

Tailored educational experiences, tours and site visits.

Housing

Local hotel (quad occupancy) accommodations, with a night chaperone to ensure security.

Meals

Two meals are provided daily: breakfast and dinner.

Education

Interactive learning experiences designed to expand educational and career goals.

Technology

Advanced student security software that integrates geofencing, logistics, communication and more optimized safety features.

Support

Dedicated 24/7 staff availability, supporting students every step of the way.

People

Program guides create a fun and engaging learning experience for students.